A Career in the Restaurant Industry

A CAREER IN THE RESTAURANT INDUSTRY

BACKGROUND
Crew member positions in the restaurant industry have often been portrayed by the media as dead end, minimum wage jobs. The truth is very different from the propaganda. The quick service industry offers unskilled workers the opportunity for employment and, in many cases, their first such opportunity. There are many different types of employees who work in our industry. There are a great number of young people who use their employment to pay for schooling or expenses as they are going through high school or college. The flexibility which our schedules provide fits well with those who have other commitments such as family or community activities. The life skills they learn (teamwork, taking direction, personal responsibility, commitment, respect towards others, and dealing with the public) serve them in whatever path they choose in school, work, and life. For unskilled workers, jobs in the quick service industry are entry level, but they are far from a dead end.

MISCONCEPTIONS VS. REALITIES
Misconception: Dead End Job
Reality: Individuals who start as crew have many opportunities to grow into career positions. 80% of our management staff started their careers as a crew member. Many of our Executive, Corporate Staff, Multi Unit Managers, and Restaurant Managers also started in the industry as crew members.

Misconception: Low Pay
Reality: While many employees’ starting wages are often near the statutory minimum wage because of their lack of work experience, their ability to increase their wages quickly through merit increases and promotion means they will not stay there for very long. In addition to their wages, management employees are eligible for bonuses. Starting wages are determined by
the economics of the area where the restaurant is located and the skill levels of each worker. It is rare that hourly employees start at the actual minimum wage as the local competition governs the hiring wage.

Misconception: Permanent Unskilled Workforce
Reality: While many of our employees come to us without significant job skills or work experience, they learn valuable business and management skills that allow them to grow into positions where they have the fundamental skills to manage a restaurant with annual sales of one million dollars and more. A high school diploma or the equivalent is the only educational requirement for our management-level employees.

Misconception: Long Hours
Reality: This industry allows individuals to tailor their schedules to work the number of hours that fits their needs. They can work full time, or just a few hours if they prefer. They can also work whatever shift (day shift, night shift, late night) fits their needs in order to receive the hours and pay they are looking for.

BENEFITS
• Unlimited growth potential
• Regular evaluations based on performance
• Proven career path
• Regular wage increases based on merit
• Flexible scheduling to fit your needs
• Learning valuable life and business skills
• Working in a supportive team oriented environment
• Ongoing training and development
• Opportunity for employer-sponsored health care

CAREER PATH
Crew Member—During the first step in the career path, hourly employees are cross trained so that they are exposed to all aspects of the business and are prepared should they express an interest in moving up the career ladder

Crew Chief—In addition to their crew member responsibilities, at this level the employee will be exposed to basic supervision of other employees and some of the administrative tasks that supervisors and managers will have to complete.

Shift Supervisor—At this level the employees are learning how to man- age others and manage a business at a basic level. They will learn how to control expenses, professionally direct others, motivate a crew, maximize sales, and how to work as a team to accomplish a common goal. The Shift Supervisor may be given authority to manage the restaurant independent of any other management person in limited times of the day.

Assistant Manager—($35,800 to $53,700*) The Assistant Manager has the responsibility to  manage a quality shift. The ability to manage and lead team members to serve high quality food, quickly, in a clean friendly atmosphere is essential during this stage. The Assistant Manager develops an understanding of financial business controls, motivating techniques, and crew member interviewing procedures. The individual continues to strengthen management and administrative skills for promotability.

Co Manager—($39,000 to $58,500*) This individual must continue to demonstrate his/her skills in managing a strong positive customer experience through the delivery of quality, service and cleanliness. In addition, the Co Manager has a complete understanding of the Profit and Loss statement. The Co Manager must demonstrate the ability to set priorities and achieve store goals. This individual is responsible for crew scheduling, crew member interviewing, and assisting in the development of the Assistant Manager, Certified Shift Supervisor, and Crew Chiefs.

General Manager – ($47,800 to $81,000*) The General Manager has total accountability for one Wendy’s restaurant. This individual is charged with the development of his/her Co Manager and Assistant Manager and readying them for promotion. The General Manager is responsible for operating a high quality restaurant and ensuring each and every guest is fully satisfied. They are responsible for executing financial controls and actively participating in community affairs.

District Manager—($59,000 to $106,200*) The District Manager is responsible for five to eight Wendy’s restaurants. A key responsibility of this position is to coordinate the activities and develop the professional abilities of restaurant management. The District Manager ensures that all business controls are enforced including financial controls, policies and procedures as well as those controls to ensure the guests receive a positive dining experience. They represent the company in community affairs and participate in many of the DVP’s responsibilities.

Division Vice President—The Divisional Vice President has primary authority and responsibility for one Division, which is a segment of 35 to 60 restaurants. The DVP is responsible for providing effective leadership and being a positive change agent, ensuring each guest receives the highest possible standards of quality, service and cleanliness. He/she has complete accountability for the financial Profit and Loss statement. The Divisional Vice President is the example setter for policies, procedures, and practices; and is responsible for developing their District management team. The DVP reports to the President.
* Salaries as of 11/1/15

AN ACTUAL SUCCESS STORY
10/19/88 Started as a Crew Member
3/12/90 Promoted to Crew Chief
2/18/91 Promoted to Shift Supervisor
12/22/91 Promoted to Manager in Training
7/26/92 Promoted to Co Manager
1/15/95 Promoted to General Manager
7/31/00 Promoted to District Manager—Responsible for 7 restaurants
5/5/14 Promoted to Division Vice President—Responsible for 51 restaurants

 

In 26 years this real life individual went from an entry level hourly employee to a Division Vice
President managing seven District Managers and 51 restaurants. Not everyone will desire to be a Division Vice President, but for those who have the desire and the talent, continuous growth can be a reality.

 

TESTIMONIALS
Scott – Currently Vice President of Human Resources
“I first applied at Wendy’s in 1978 because I was going to college in the fall and I needed money. Wendy’s was my first job. My first manager was very patient with me as I learned all of the positions. When it came time to leave for college, he told me to call Wendy’s anytime I came  home from school and they would put me back on the schedule. They did, and I worked there off and on for the next 4 years until I graduated. “During this time, Wendy’s tried to get me to move into management. I wanted to finish my degree. I applied for a management position in 1983 and have been with Wendy’s ever since. I spent five years as a manager in the stores including 2 years as a General Manager. I knew that I wanted to get into the Training Department and got that opportunity in 1988. I have been in the Corporate Office ever since and promoted several times. During this time, I decided to go back to school and get a Master’s Degree in Human Resource Development. Thanks to Wendy’s tuition reimbursement program, I was able to earn my degree. Wendy’s is not only my employer but my family.”

 

Gracelyn – Currently District Manager, North Division
“My name is Gracelyn, I’m a District Manager for the North Division Baltimore District 1. In my district I’m in charge of seven stores mainly located in the Inner City of Baltimore and surrounding County.  “I started at Wendy’s in the fall of 1977, my freshman year in college. I started out as a crew member working the cash register every day. My situation changed while in school when I became a single mother. I decided that, since business was my major and I was working in a fast food restaurant, I would inquire about growth within the company. “I spoke with my supervisors and found out what I needed to do to move ahead. I contacted Human Resources and the rest is history. During the next 37 years, I moved from Crew Chief to Assistant Manager, Co Manager, General Manager and now District Manager. I truly thank the  DavCo Family (Yes, family, that’s how I feel working for this Company) for giving me the opportunity to be all that I could be.  “P.S. My daughter is now married with children and working in the medical field.”

 

David – Currently District Manager, South Division
“I moved to Baltimore in 1990, broke and in need of a job, so I visited the Wendy’s on Security Blvd and asked if they were hiring. The manager on duty said yes. I started as a crew member and the General Manager made the work place a family environment that made it easy for me to fit in.  “After a few years I found that I needed to make more money so I asked my District Manager for a pay increase. He said the money is in Management. I worked hard to get promoted to Shift Manager and had to make a decision about my hair style. Fortunately for me I had the opportunity to meet a member of the Corporate Training staff, who informed me that if I made the right decision it would affect my future career.  “My thanks to DavCo and their support in making me aware that there was a career in fast food. I went through all levels of management and have been a District Manager for 15 years. Because of the opportunities that the restaurant business offered me, I was able to buy a house, get married, and can now afford to send my children to a private school.”

 

Karen – Currently General Manager/Phase II Training Store Manager “I was newly married and just arrived in Maryland from Germany where we lived. My husband was stationed in the Army. I realized I needed a part time job to help save money for a house and other expenses to live in Pasadena to be near our families.“Years later I realized that Wendy’s was not just a part time job, but a career and something I actually enjoyed doing. Wendy’s dedicates and invests time and training in internally promoting employees to help build the company and make it stronger. No matter where you end up you always remember where you started and who trained you and are always grateful for the time they invested.”

 

Kyle – Currently General Manager/Phase I Training  Store Manager “When I was 17 years old, I chose to participate in Diversified Occupations at my High School. I chose to apply to Wendy’s because it was the closest fast food restaurant to the small town I lived in. In the beginning I only asked for 15 hours a week, part time, because that’s all my school required to get out on half days. Summer came and I decided to take on more hours as I now had plenty of free time. “Wendy’s provided me with the opportunity to not only have a job but to have a career. I moved up the ladder from crew to Crew Chief to Shift Supervisor to Assistant Manager in a matter of 6 months. With very little leadership experience, Wendy’s gave me the management and food safety training I needed to excel. And I did.  “I was raised by my mother who taught me to treat every person in this world with respect, to do what’s right and to always try my hardest because in the end hard work pays off. And it did. I lived by those morals and taught them to every crew member I came across. I went into every shift knowing it would be successful, not wondering if I would succeed. After 4 years of dedication and hard work, I was presented with the opportunity to become General Manager, and I took it. My goal of becoming a Training Store Manager came at last.  “People come up to me and wonder how, at my young age of 24 (now I’m 25), I was able to become a General Manager of a million dollar restaurant. I tell them, age is just a number, and it’s all about a person’s drive and aspirations to be whatever they want to be in life. I was just grateful to be given the opportunity by Wendy’s and the chance to succeed. And I have.”

And now you know, Quick Service Restaurant jobs are anything but “dead end jobs.” If you have the desire and ambition to get ahead, give us a call or visit your local Wendy’s Restaurant.

DavCo Restaurants
1657 Crofton Blvd. • Crofton, Md. 21114
Phone (410) 721-3770 • www.wendavco.com
Apply at https://careers.wendys.com/